Bruce's Blog

a handful of dimes and a jukebox

So Kong Dong1

Faithful readers of this blog will note that I haven’t reported any lunches for a few weeks.  The problem is that I have been frustrated by my new camera.  The problem turned out to be the SD card, which lost the photos before I could get them off the camera.   But I will tell you about my lunch the other day and an idea as an adjunct project for this site.

I searched through Yelp and found an interesting place called So Kong Dong, at 2716 W Olympic Blvd, Suite 104, in LA.  So Kong Dong is basically a tofu joint, and first rate at that.  You can get bulgogi, but most of the dishes are tofu in hot soup with your choice of stuff.  I got the tofu with lots ‘o stuff, including beef, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, and other  Mysterious Things.  When the banchan came, one of the items was what I thought to be a hard boiled egg.  Unusual, but ok, I’ve seen weirder stuff.  Turns out that it was a raw egg, and when the soup, heated no-doubt in the fires of hades, came out, I should have added the raw egg to it and mixed it around.  I didn’t observe others doing that until after it was too cool for the intended effect.  Next time…

So Kong Dong2The shrimp included in the soup were whole unshelled shrimp, heads and all.   I’ve eaten fried shrimp heads — which somehow seems different.  But what the hey, I popped ’em in my mouth, and they were tasty.  The banchan, I should mention, was excellent and included a sample of their raw spicy blue crab, which was really great, but difficult to figure out how to eat.  The tofu soup is $8.99 across the board for any of your choice of ingredients.  I’m curious to try it with kimchee.   The tofu itself was lovely;  soft and creamy.

Before the meal, the waitress brought out a stone thing (very cute, I’d love to have one) that was yet another nuclear hot Korean thing which contained rice.  The waitress scooped out rice from the thing but left about a half-inch of rice along the side of it, and poured some water in the thing.  I watched a mother carefully scraping the remaining rice, which had browned very nicely.  I’m not positive, but I think that this then becomes a rice soup.   It tasted nice anyway. 🙂

So Kong Dong3It occurred to me that there seems to be some mysterious law within Korean restaurants to allow customers one napkin only, when you know in advance that you’re going to need at least a few, especially if you are getting BBQ and wrapping it in a variety of lettuces, which is wonderful but messy.  I would love to know how to say, “Can I get some extra napkins, please?” in Korean.  So I’ve decided to create another page for this blog, which will collect some common phrases for eating in ethnic restaurants.   I tend to pick Korean and Thai mostly, so I’m going to start there.  If you know either of these languages and spot errors and/or want to make a contribution, please comment!!

 

4 Responses so far.

  1. Tracey Carson says:

    Start eating and posting more, please… I’m hungry and want to live vicariously through your tastebuds:)

  2. brucedumes says:

    Thanks Jasmin! And Tracey! 😉

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